Saturday, July 3, 2010

I saw this coming from the start.

In the beginning of the Obama presidency, mandatory Medicaid, was touted as a way for those with pre-existing conditions to get coverage. It was prophecied that it would shorten our wait times in emergency rooms, and reduce the costs we would pay.

In fact, while the politicians were fighting to bend us over the barrel and ram it up our collective national ass, they promised us these things, as well as that funding for research into conditions like cancer, AIDS, Alzheimers, and diabetes would continue. Basically, we were promised that it would heal all the sick, and wouldn't make anyone dead.

Like I told my friend that was for it way before it was passed--that ain't gonna happen. Neither is making it cheaper, or making wait times for care in emergency rooms shorter. The government is in the power business, not the philanthropy business (i.e., making sure those with preexisting conditions got the coverage they "deserved").

Looks like I was right. Experts are now predicting that preexisting conditions won't be covered under mandatory Medicaid, and that emergency room waits will be much longer than they are now.

3 comments:

  1. And it's better than the existing system how? The whole "no pre-existing conditions" thing was a major part of the promotion.

    Wait until they rethink the "no death panels" thing.

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  2. It's better than the existing system in that it gives the government greater control of our behavior. Or so they think.

    Also, Ricki, watch for your workplace health insurance to show up on your W2 starting in 2011 as added income. Never have I been so glad to be a part-time contract employee with no benefits.

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  3. The first time Obama pitched the
    new health care plan AND NO PRE EXISTING CONDITIONS, I said NO WAY!

    If pre-existing conditions were included in 'current' policies, the health insurance business would have been bankrupt long ago or premiums would have been too costly than they are now.

    High risk pool? OK fine...but who foots the bill on the high risk?

    I am inclined to think that there is no solution to the healthcare
    quagmire!

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