Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Good thing that the Constitution and its amendments overrides all other laws...

Otherwise, we might be forced to give evidence against ourselves by judges who interpret the fifth amendment to not include our personal computers.

Oh, wait...never mind.

Seriously, were I in Friscou's position, I'd refuse.  I'd refuse the judge that issued the illegal order, and I'd refuse if an appellate judge supported it, and I'd insist on the Supreme Court telling me that I had to decrypt my laptop.  Then, I'd refuse again, because it is a violation of the fifth amendment, whether the "justice" system recognizes it or not.  The prosecutors that want her to decrypt her laptop have said they won't hold the action of decrypting her laptop against her.  What about the evidence that may or may not be on the laptop?  If that's what might convict her, the lawyers aren't what will hold the act against her.

In short, they're trying to force her to testify against herself with this absurd order to decrypt her own laptop. 

7 comments:

  1. Ahhh rubber hose decryption at it's finest.

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  2. "I'm sorry, your honor, the head trauma made me forget my password."

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  3. Damn lighter fluid....and then my zippo dropped...

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  4. I'm not sure if that would work, Stephen--too much time where they could save the laptop.

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  5. Start entering the wrong password, exactly how do they prove you haven't forgotten it?

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  6. Just like government trying to control guns by registering them; it would be an impossible job to confiscate them all.......

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  7. I think MO realized that--we no longer register ours. And I don't think there's any way to force us to tell what we have, any more than they can really force this woman to decrypt her own laptop.

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