Thursday, March 27, 2014

Well, that was interesting.

I just had a conference with a student.  A married female Saudi student whose husband is also in my class with her (and having much less trouble). 

Come to find out, I have a lot more common ground with her than I do most of the American women I'm around. 

Maybe I need to look for friends in the more traditional cultures--ones that the religion doesn't give me the suspicious heebie-jeebies. 

8 comments:

  1. Break out your Burka. Sounds like they are going to convert you to Islam. Somehow, I can't see you being much in sympathy with islamic culture. They treat their women like cattle. And if you don't conform, they kill you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm really not. Islam is a political system that deliberately spawned a religion to control their people, if you read real history, and not their "religious" book.

      Delete
  2. I've developed a friendship with a man that once owned a convenience store and now only works in one. His wife, who helped in the store they owned, works another shift at the same store. Both, who don't drink coffee, are proud of their much appreciated effort to keep a pot of hot, fresh coffee at all times and demand a better brand for their customers.

    He's Pakistani, has a strong work ethic, put his daughters through college and is now proud of one that's a doctor and the other that's working on her CPA, so she can increase her earning potential.

    I have no idea of what he believes, since he doesn't expound on it and I don't ask. He's fine folks in my book, and I find he represents what many have failed to teach as the greatest thing about the United States.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't mind if I don't know, but she's covered constantly head to toe--the only way it could be worse is if she wore a burkha.

      Delete
    2. Londonistan by Melonie Philips would make an interesting read for anyone who espouses the open arms approach to welcoming Islam into this country. Or, you could actually travel in some Islamic states and see it in practice. We've already had a rash of "honor killings" in Atlanta as a result of such heinous crimes as teenage girls wearing blue jeans. I had an interesting and informative travel experience in Lebanon, for instance, 1982-1983 and I don't consider Islamic immigration into this country as the greatest thing about it.

      Delete
    3. I think Jess was more referring to the willingness to work, and work hard.

      Delete
    4. My friend left his homeland, worked hard to establish a business, made enough to insure his daughters could survive in our society and continues to be productive, even after selling his business.

      What does that mean? He wanted to be part in the "American Dream" and he succeeded. He didn't try to change our society; he assimilated and contributed. That's a good thing.

      Delete
    5. yes, I suppose so. Our experience here with Pakistanis who come in and buy up every gas station and hotel/ motel in town has not been so bucolic. However, I concede individuals should be judged on their own merit. Having seen Islam first hand, and not the watered down version presented to us in this country, I have a healthy respect for the damage it can cause. I would rather it not take hold here but it's too late now anyway, it's the fastest growing religion in the Southern states, with great appeal to black Americans in particular, though not solely to that group. As the British have found out , when it comes to Islam you reap what you sew.

      Delete